neosoul.blues
Weblinks

Angeschaut

You could say he was an old­time down­dunnit blues man pouring out his tortured

soul 12 bars at a time, but that wouldn’t quite cut it as a portrait. Too easy, see.

Maxim Vaga is a blues­rock man­ singer, pianist and songwriter ­ born and bred in

the streets of Berlin during the Cold War. Vaga eludes the stereotype ­ it’s as if he

himself is still on the run, rolling the rustiest boxcar on a long locomotive packed with

only his beat down pianoforte passing between time and place ­ and that is precisely

what makes his sound so seductive, without the saccharine nostalgia or downtrodden

melancholy so often associated with contemporary blues acts. Vaga’s

blues evokes the ghostly shanties of barge­haulers of the old East, rather than the

tired chain­gang repertoire of the Deep South. His youthful face belies the

profoundest mysteries his rasping, poignant vocal hints at: the timbre reminiscent of

Junior Wells, and together with his gift for enigmatic, lyrical double­dealing, he

harnesses the power of great story­tellers like Poe, Kafka, Orson Welles and Knut

Hamsun.

And there is a Sisyphian passion at its source, driving his voice through

each song, set and boozy rain­soaked tour without ever hinting at despair or ruin, as

if coming from some stranger, alien spirit, producing such an entrancing effect on

audiences as to be worthy of comparisons with the sober, growling, juvenile Jim

Morrison at the Whiskey Go Go.

From the depths of the dreary winter of today’s music scene, there is in Maxim Vaga

a kind of eternal summer that is palpable, still dripping from audiences of all the

shindigs, diners and dive bars across Europe

painted crimson by his sound.

After seeing his recent performances in Berlin and Paris and hearing of an

upcoming, EP entitled Hunger I caught up with Maxim Vaga and, unsurprisingly,

found the man symbiotically connected to his music yet distinctly separate, as if he

were its proxy. This explains the dissonant ambience that one is awake to while at

the sametimebeing totally gripped bythemellifluous music andtight­knit band.

Vaga had,fromhisearliest memories, tramped andtroubadoured around Europe,

being once held up at gun­point and another time surrounded by a pack of

Pyreneean wolfdogs, experiences that seem terrifying but for the quiet, almost noble

calm with which he recounts them, perhaps pointing also to the reason behind his

fortunate escapes. He was once on a ship that nearly sank off the coast of Bari and,

after a fire had broken out and the swell crashed through the ship's ceiling, Vaga

remembers being “so sick, that I was not able to feel any fear. It was a soothing

indifference I felt being so powerless at the sight of those blustering waves„. Quietly

spoken, attending to each syllable like a German Romantic poet counting his

pentameter, Vaga obliquely explains what he means: “I never found religion; I did

spend the night on a grave, did talk to the dead, did find signs in dreams, did do a lot

of doing nothing, because nothing seemed that important in the big picture. But

music is always there.„ (He curiously emphasised “THAT„, but only gave a little smile

when drawn to the inverse meaning, i.e. the importance of nothing).

The song that exemplifies this sense that things are not as they first seem on the

surface is This Love Ain’t No Funny Thing, which at once exalts, then condemns,

saying both without saying either. The same is true for Vaga’s anti­anthemic

antihymn, Hunger, where the spirit of noble strength in the face of universal

indifference draws upon the themes of deprivation and want without ever feeling, or

sounding

like, desperation or need. It sounds like the music that sometimes a man has to

make.

... zum Bandprofil